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Small Business Retirement

Whether you're self-employed or have a company with hundreds of employees, Merrill Edge® makes it easy to get a retirement solution. With a Small Business 401(k), SEP IRA and SIMPLE IRA — we offer plans tailored to fit your business needs. No matter which you choose, you can get easy setup, low costs and simple administration. And best of all, even if you already have a plan, Merrill Edge® offers a simplified and affordable way to plan for retirement.

Learn about the benefits of our Small Business 401(k), SEP IRA and SIMPLE IRA retirement plans. You can also view their features side by side with
our comparison chart. Comparison Chart

Merrill Edge® Small Business 401(k) offers you and your employees the retirement benefits you deserve. With Merrill Edge, you can get a 401(k) plan designed with features that help meet the unique needs of your business, at a price that fits your budget.

  • Set up fee waived for a limited time – this is a savings of up to $3901
  • Potential for significant tax benefits for your business
  • Investments selected and managed by Morningstar Associates, LLC, helping you manage
    some of your fiduciary responsibilities
  • A simplified and secure online setup process, with call-center support if you need it
  • Your business may be eligible for up to a $500 tax credit for the first three years if this is your first 401(k) plan and you have employees

Merrill Edge® Small Business SEP IRA is designed to accommodate the variable revenue streams of small businesses, and provides the opportunity for significant tax benefits. A SEP IRA is a good way to reward your employees while giving you the ability to contribute to your own retirement savings.

  • Get up to $600 added to your new account2
  • High annual contribution limits versus an individual IRA — up to $51,0003
  • Flexible employer contribution options from year to year, depending on your cash flow
  • A wide range of investment options for you to choose from
  • No start-up or annual program administration fees
  • Little to no paperwork required and filing with the IRS is not necessary

Merrill Edge® Small Business SIMPLE IRA is designed for employers who want to offer their employees the opportunity to invest in their retirement. With a SIMPLE IRA, you'll get many of the benefits of a SEP IRA as well as the ability to match employee contributions.

  • A good option for businesses with predictable cash flows
  • A wide range of investment options for you to choose from
  • Employer contributions are generally tax-deductible to your business
  • Employees can contribute with pre-tax salary deferrals
  • Filing with the IRS is not necessary
  • Mandatory employer contributions help employees′ accounts accumulate wealth

Compare the benefits of our 401(k), SEP IRA and SIMPLE IRA plans to find the one that’s best for you.

SIMPLE IRA SEP IRA 401(k) Plan
For corporate employers, the self-employed, sole
proprietorships, partnerships, non-profits1
Both the employer and the employee can make contributions
May be able to exclude part-time employees
After-tax or Roth contributions
Loans are an available option
Employer contributions are discretionary
Contributions are immediately vested2
Contributions are generally tax deductible by the business
Plan expenses are generally tax deductible by the business
No IRS Form 5500 filing is required3
1 Employers with 100 or fewer employees who earned $5,000 or more during the preceding calendar year may consider a SIMPLE IRA plan. 2 The term vesting refers to whether or not the money that has been set aside for you in a retirement plan is yours to keep if your employment is terminated. "Vested" benefits are those to which you have an absolute right even if you resign or are terminated. 3 IRS Form 5500 is a form that 401(k) plans use to satisfy reporting required by law. Small business IRA plans do not file IRS Form 5500. Contributions made by a business owner to a SEP or SIMPLE are claimed as a deduction by the business owner on his/her business tax returns. See IRS Publication 560.